The Page

In the following, you can see our page step by step. I will go through its functions and quickly explain what the user sees and what happens once he interacts with it.

If the page is accessed for the first time, the user will end up here. It is the login/signup page and the user has the option to either just log in..

Screenshot (297)

..or to create a new account after he clicked the button saying “No account”. A form toggles up asking the user to enter some things needed for using the account: Gender, Name, Password and the Student ID. He also has to enter his password twice to ensure that he has not misspelled it. All the forms have different conditions the user has to stick to. The password for example has to contain at least one number to enhance security. If he does not stick to those, he will be informed and has a chance to change his details. After entering those things correctly, he will receive a message confirming his registration. His details were saved into the users table that was set up into the database. He then has the option to either access the main site by logging in or returning later to do so. If he chooses to log in, a query searches the database for his name and password and if they are found, he will be logged in and a session is started.

Also, he will from then on see the following page. It is structured into two main parts, the navigation bar that enables the user to access other pages and the body of the pages displaying the posts. The user can read and scroll through those posts and using the form integrated into the navigation bar, he can contribute by writing his own posts.

Screenshot (298)

In case the user changes his mind, he can delete them afterwards. As you can see in the picture, the user is only enabled to delete his own posts since only those contain a delete button. If he chooses to add a post, the data entered into the form will be saved to the database as well as his ID, a timestamp and a unique ID for the post. So, even though the posts are displayed anonymously, it can still be kept track of the person who made them. This might be important in a case of misuse and also to enable the person to only delete their own. If he chooses to delete a post, the post will be removed from the database, noting that the unique post ID will be removed as well but even though it is not there anymore, it can never be used again.

Screenshot (289)

The post boxes display the content as well as the gender, the location and a time function telling the user how long ago certain posts were made.

If the user wants to delete his account, he can easily do that using the delete button integrated into the navigation bar. To avoid accidents, the button does not directly delete the account but makes another button toggle down that also has to be clicked. The principal behind it is very similar to the ‘delete post’ buttons.

Screenshot (290)

If the user chooses to write a post, he has to stick to the given word limit which is a 1000 words maximum and 4 words minimum. If he does not, a window will inform him again and he won’t be able to submit the post until he changes it.

Screenshot (291)

Once he clicked ‘submit’ the post will be submitted and the user will receive a message confirming that.

Screenshot (292)

The user can navigate using the navigation bar and access the four different pages. The first one is the “about us” page, telling him all about the creators of the page. If the users feels like gaining more information about the development, he can click one of the “view blog” buttons to be redirected to our blogs. In the following, he can read more about the page.

Screenshot (294)Screenshot (293)

The search page enables the user to search through all of the already existing posts using one or more words/numbers/ect. The results will be displayed after he clicked the button saying “Go!” Also, the posting form in the navigation bar is hidden for this page.

Screenshot (295)

The last page is the filter page. It enables the user to filter the posts by location which makes it easier so read what happenes around him. The posting form is replaced with the filter form, letting the user choose the location. By default all the posts will be displayed.

Screenshot (296)

At all this time, the user can quickly logout using the “logout” button that is never hidden as well as delete his account using the “delete” button. If he chooses to log out, the session will be destroyed and the user will be redirected to the login/signup page.

Advertisements

Holidays and what I have been doing

Since I was going home for the holidays, my group and I decided to finish most of the project before the Easter break. To do so, we had a group meeting on the last Friday before and because during this group meeting we noticed that a lot of things still had to be done, me and Tina decided to stay at Uni a bit longer to finish the work. During this night, Tina worked on the aboutus.php page and since I had the PHP for our page finished at this point, focussed a bit on the design aspect as well as I helped other course members with their PHP. Beccy could not stay because she had to go home but she said she would take care of making the page responsive. Also, she worked on the PHP for the search engine and because she finished it this day, I integrated it into the page.  At the end of this, we had a functional site with a newer design as well as the aboutus page working.

I then went home for holidays and spent some time ‘cleaning up’ the code, like taking out things we did not need anymore and formatting. I also changed some small things, like replacing ‘ucfirst’ with ‘ucwords’ in some cases, so not only the first letter of the first word would be capital but the first of every word. That was important for example for the locations that consisted of two words instead of one. I then looked through the file on my computer and the one on github and uploaded all the changes I had made. To double check if the github version was working, I downloaded the .zip file and looked at the page using XAMPP. I then did some more edits and in the end, the version was up to date.

After all of this was done and we were sure that we would not make any major additions to the code, I started commenting the PHP. Once I am back, I offered to meet up with my teammates to go through all the code and comments together so we would all have an understanding of everything.

Finding a name

Tina took on the task to find a name /logo for our website. Doing that, she asked the rest of the group if they had any ideas and then put together a Mind-Map. While our trip to the beach, we thought about maybe using something animal related, preferable the turtle since it is a sea animal, but we did not have a clear idea of what exactly.

So, she made the Mind Map and then we talked a bit about what she thought of and we added some other possible ideas. The name was supposed to aim at students and we thought it would be nice to relate it somehow to “talking” since the whole idea is based around students sharing small stories.

Here you can see the Mind-Map Tina put together:

11039382_841807095892637_1091697328_n

Possible names were for example “Hidden Messages”, “Anonymous Turtle” or “Turtle Posts”. We then did a little vote and the three names that we liked most were:

  1. Turtle Talks
  2. Ghost Mail
  3. Unipost

If you want to read more about that, you can look at Tina’s Blog that is references below.


References:

Sabine, T., 2014. Tina’s Blog. Available from: https://christinasabine.wordpress.com/ [Accessed on the 11th March 2014]